Anthropology

ANTH 50 First-Year Seminar: Skeletons in the Closet (3). In this first-year seminar, students explore the use of the human skeleton to modern behavioral and biological investigations, focusing on observations that are used as evidence to prove or disprove hypotheses.

ANTH 54 First-Year Seminar: The Indians’ New Worlds: Southeastern Histories from 1200 to 1800 (AMST 54) (3). See AMST 54 for description.

ANTH 60 First-Year Seminar: Crisis and Resilience (3).

ANTH 64 First-Year Seminar: Public Archaeology in Bronzeville, Chicago’s Black Metropolis (3). In the early 20th century millions of African Americans migrated to large northern cities. The Phyllis Wheatley Home for Girls was run by black women to provide social services for female migrants to Chicago starting in 1926. The course combines elements of archaeology, anthropology, and history to study their lives.

ANTH 65 First-Year Seminar: Humans and Animals (3).

ANTH 121 Ancient Cities of the Americas (3). An introduction to archaeology through the study of towns and cities built by the ancient peoples of the Americas. The focus is on historical processes by which these centers arose.

ANTH 123 Habitat and Humanity (3). Cross-cultural survey of building and landscape architecture, including prehistoric dwellings and sacred structures such as shrines and temples. Emphasis on architecture as symbolic form and cultural meaning.

ANTH 145 Introduction to World Prehistory (3). Introduction to world prehistory and archaeological methods. Examines the development of human society from the emergence of modern human beings 100,000 years ago through the formation of ancient civilizations.

ANTH 148 Human Origins (3). Study of human evolution. Focus on the fossil record of humans and human-like ancestors. Topics include communication, aggression, dietary adaptations, locomotion, major anatomical changes, and behavioral shifts in an evolutionary framework.

ANTH 220 Principles of Archaeology (3). Introduction to method and theory in archaeology. An examination of how archaeologists make inferences about past societies, including reconstruction of culture histories; lifeways; ideologies; and social, political, and economic relationships.

ANTH 222 Prehistoric Art (3). A survey of prehistoric art in Africa, the Americas, Australia, and Europe.

ANTH 231 Archaeology of South America (3). An examination of the prehistory of Andean South America (Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia) from first colonization 12,000 years ago to the fall of the Inca Empire in 1532 CE.

ANTH 232 Ancestral Maya Civilizations (3). Maya civilization is prominent among American societies that flourish prior to European incursions. Archaeological, epigraphic, and historical materials provide the foundation for understanding this past and its romance allure.

ANTH 233 Prehistory of Southwest Asia (3).

ANTH 250 Archaeology of North America (3). The history of North American Indian cultures from 10,000 BCE to the time of the European colonization as reconstructed by archaeological research. Special emphasis on the eastern and southwestern United States.

ANTH 252 Prehistoric Foodways (3). Archaeological investigations of prehistoric and historic foodways. Surveys the questions asked, the data and methods used to answer those questions, and the contributions of subsistence studies to archaeological knowledge.

ANTH 291 Archaeological Theory and Practice (3). A review of historical and theoretical developments that have framed archaeological research, including a discussion of substantive changes in research questions, topics, methods, and analyses that reshaped the field. Course will place American archaeology in a wider international context.

ANTH 411 Laboratory Methods in Archaeology (3). An examination of the laboratory techniques used by archaeologists to analyze artifacts and organic remains, including the analysis of stone tools, pottery, botanical remains, and bone.

ANTH 412 Paleoanthropology (3). This course traces the evolution of humans and nonhuman primates—including behaviors, tools, and bodies of monkeys, apes, and human hunters and gatherers—evolutionary theory, and paleoanthropological methods.

ANTH 413 Archaeobotany Lab Methods (3). Required preparation, any course in archaeology or permission of the instructor. A general survey of the laboratory techniques used to study and draw social and behavioral inferences from plant remains recovered from archaeological sites.

ANTH 413L Archaeobotany Lab (1). Required preparation, any course in archaeology or permission of the instructor. This is a required one-hour laboratory section to be taken in conjunction with ANTH 413.

ANTH 414 Laboratory Methods: Human Osteology (3). This course will focus on the analysis of human skeletal materials in the laboratory and in the field, with an emphasis on basic identification, age and sex estimation, and quantitative analysis.

ANTH 414L Human Osteology Lab (1). Corequisite, ANTH 414. The laboratory analysis of human skeletal materials with an emphasis on basic identification, age and sex estimation, and quantitative analysis.

ANTH 415 Laboratory Methods: Zooarchaeology (3). This course will focus on the analysis of animal remains from archaeological sites. Introduction to laboratory methods, analytical approaches, and interpretive frameworks for zooarchaeology.

ANTH 415L Zooarchaeology Lab (1). Corequisite, ANTH 415. Required preparation, an archaeological course or permission of instructor. Examination of identification techniques, quantitative methods, and interpretive frameworks used to analyze animal remains recovered from archaeological sites.

ANTH 416 Bioarchaeology (3). The study of human skeletal remains from archaeological contexts. The collection and interpretation of quantitative and qualitative data is emphasized to assess the relationship between past biology, environment, culture, and behavior.

ANTH 417 Laboratory Methods: Lithic Seminar (3). Laboratory techniques in stone tool research and experimental practice.

ANTH 417L Lithic Analysis Lab (1). Corequisite, ANTH 417. Required preparation, any course in archaeology or permission of the instructor. This is a required one-hour laboratory section to be taken in conjunction with ANTH 417.

ANTH 418 Laboratory Methods: Ceramic Analysis (3). A survey of the laboratory techniques used by archaeologists to study and draw social and behavioral inferences from ancient pottery.

ANTH 421 Archaeological Geology (GEOL 421) (3). Permission of the instructor. The application of geological principles and techniques to the solution of archaeological problems. Studies geological processes and deposits pertinent to archaeological sites, geologic framework of archaeology in the southeastern United States, and techniques of archaeological geology. Field trips to three or more sites; written reports required.

ANTH 423 Written in Bone: CSI and the Science of Death Investigation from Skeletal Remains (3). This course combines laboratory training, field projects, lectures, films, discussion, and student presentations into a course on the science of human skeletal analysis. Students learn the laboratory methods scientists use to study human remains and the role of skeletal analysis in the study of contemporary forensic cases.

ANTH 451 Field School in North American Archaeology (6). Intensive training in archaeological field methods and techniques. Students participate in the excavation, recovery, recording, and interpretation of archaeological remains. Instruction given in survey, mapping, photography, flotation recovery, etc.

ANTH 453 Field School in South American Archaeology (6). Intensive study of archaeological field and laboratory methods and prehistory of the Andes through excavation and analysis of materials from archaeological sites in Peru. Includes tours of major archaeological sites.

ANTH 454 The Archaeology of African Diasporas (3). Considers how archaeological evidence is used to understand the movement of Africans and their descendants across the globe, with an emphasis on the transformation of societies on the African continent and in the Americas.

ANTH 455 Ethnohistory (FOLK 455) (3). Integration of data from ethnographic and archaeological research with pertinent historic information. Familiarization with a wide range of sources for ethnohistoric data and practice in obtaining and evaluating information. Pertinent theoretical concepts will be explored.

ANTH 456 Archaeology and Ethnography of Small-Scale Societies (3). The study of small-scale hunter-gatherer and farming societies from archaeological and ethnographic perspectives. Methods and theories for investigating economic, ecological, and social relations in such societies are explored.

ANTH 458 Archaeology of Sex and Gender (WMST 458) (3). A discussion of gender and sex roles and sexuality in past cultures; a cross-cultural examination of ways of knowing about past human behavior.

ANTH 460 Historical Ecology (ENST 460) (3). Historical ecology is a framework for integrating physical, biological, and social science data with insights from the humanities to understand the reciprocal relationship between human activity and the earth system.

ANTH 468 State Formation (3). The course examines the state, from its initial appearance 5,000 years ago to newly established nation–states, exploring the concepts of ethnicity, class, race, and history in state formation and maintenance.

ANTH 538 Disease and Discrimination in Colonial Atlantic America (3). Colonization of Atlantic America between 1500 and 1900, through landscape change, agriculture, poverty, labor discrimination, and slavery differentially placed subsets of the general population at risk for infectious disease and other insults to their health. Lecture and discussion using archaeological and bioarchaeological studies, modern disease studies, and historic documents.

ANTH 550 Archaeology of the American South (3). Current issues and interpretations in the archaeology of the American South. Through weekly readings and discussions, students will explore the lifeways and changes that characterized each major period of the South’s ancient history, from 12,000 years ago to the beginnings of European colonization.

ANTH 551 Origins of Agriculture (3).

ANTH 650 Reconstructing Life: Nutrition and Disease in Past Populations (3). This is an advanced course in the reconstruction of nutrition and health in past populations. Among the topics explored are epidemiology, disease ecology, dietary reconstruction, and paleopathology.

ANTH 674 Issues in Cultural Heritage (3).

Classical Archaeology

CLAR 50 First-Year Seminar: Art in the Ancient City (3). The course offers a comparative perspective on the archaeology of ancient Egypt and Bronze Age Greece (3000–1100 BCE) exploring the public art produced by these two early Mediterranean societies: the Aegean Bronze Age palace centers of Crete and Mainland Greece and the territorial state of ancient Egypt.

CLAR 51 Who Owns the Past (3).

CLAS 71 Architecture of Empire (3).

CLAR 110 The Archaeology of Palestine in the New Testament Period (JWST 110, RELI 110) (3). This course surveys the archaeology of Palestine (modern Israel and Jordan) from the Persian period (circa 586 BC) to the Muslim conquest (640 AD).

CLAR 120 Ancient Cities (3). An introduction to Mediterranean archaeology through the examination of archaeological sites from the Neolithic period (ca. 9000 BCE) to the Roman Empire (fourth century CE). The sites, geographic and cultural areas, and chronological periods of study vary depending on instructor. Does not satisfy classical archaeology major requirements.

CLAR 241 Archaeology of Ancient Near East (3). A survey of the cultures of the ancient Near East, Mesopotamia, Anatolia (modern Turkey) and the Levant, from the first settled villages of the ninth millennium to the Persian conquest of Babylon in 539 BCE.

CLAR 242 Archaeology of Egypt (3). A survey of the archaeological remains of ancient Egypt, from the earliest settlements of the Neolithic period until the end of the New Kingdom.

CLAR 243 Minoans and Mycenaeans: The Archaeology of Bronze Age Greece (3). A survey of the material culture of Greece, the Cyclades, and Crete from the Paleolithic period (ca. 50,000 years ago) until the end of the Bronze Age (ca. 1200 BCE). Primary focus will be the urbanized palatial centers that emerged in mainland Greece (Mycenaean) and the island of Crete (Minoan).

CLAR 244 Greek Archaeology (3). The historical development of the art and architecture of Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period.

CLAR 245 Archaeology of Italy (3). The historical development of the Italian peninsula as seen in its physical remains, with emphasis upon Etruscan and Roman sites.

CLAR 247 Roman Archaeology (3). This course explores the archaeology of the Roman world between the eighth century BCE and the fifth century CE, focusing on issues of urbanization, trade and consumption, colonization, and the Roman army.

CLAR 262 Art of Classical Greece (ARTH 262) (3). Required preparation, any introductory art history course or permission of the instructor. A chronological study of the main developments of Greek sculpture, architecture, and painting from the fifth to the first centuries BCE.

CLAR 263 Roman Art (ARTH 263) (3). The arts of Rome, particularly architecture, sculpture, and painting, preceded by a survey of Etruscan and Hellenic art and their influence on Rome.

CLAR 268 Hellenistic Art and Archaeology (350–31 BCE) (3). Survey of the archaeology of the Hellenistic Mediterranean from the time of Alexander the Great until the Roman conquest (350–31 BCE), with emphasis on art and architecture of cities and sanctuaries.

CLAR 375 The Archaeology of Cult: The Material Culture of Greek Religion (RELI 375) (3). This course examines the archaeological context of Greek religion, cults, and associated rituals from the Bronze Age until the Hellenistic period with emphasis on urban, rural, and panhellenic sanctuaries, and methods of approaching ancient religion and analyzing cult practices.

CLAR 411 Archaeological Field Methods (3). Systematic introduction to archaeological field methods, especially survey and excavation techniques.

CLAR 440 Problems in the History of Classical Ideas (3). Permission of the department.

CLAR 460 Greek Painting (ARTH 460) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A survey of the development of Greek art from geometric to Hellenistic painting through a study of Greek vases, mosaics, and mural paintings.

CLAR 461 Archaic Greek Sculpture (ARTH 461) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A focused study of sculpture during the Archaic period in Greece.

CLAR 462 Classical Greek Sculpture (ARTH 462) (3). Permission of the instructor. A focused study of Greek sculpture during the classical period.

CLAR 463 Hellenistic Greek Sculpture (ARTH 463) (3). Required preparation, any intermediate art history course or permission of the instructor. A focused study of Greek sculpture in the Hellenistic period.

CLAR 464 Greek Architecture (ARTH 464) (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 244. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A survey of Greek architectural development from the Dark Ages through the fourth century BCE. Special topics include the beginnings of monumental architecture, the development of the orders, and interpretations of individual architects in terms of style and proportions.

CLAR 465 Architecture of Etruria and Rome (ARTH 465) (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 245. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. The development of architecture in the Roman world from the ninth century BCE through the fourth century CE. The course focuses on the development of urbanism and the function, significance, and evolution of the main building types and their geographic distribution.

CLAR 474 Roman Sculpture (ARTH 474) (3). Survey of Roman sculpture (200 BCE–300 CE), including portraiture, state reliefs, funerary monuments, and idealizing sculpture, with emphasis on style, iconography, and historical development of sculpture in its sociocultural, political, and religious contexts.

CLAR 475 Rome and the Western Provinces (3). Survey of the material remains of the Western provinces of the Roman Empire, with attention to their historical context and significance.

CLAR 476 Roman Painting (ARTH 476) (3). Surveys Roman painting from 200 BCE to 300 CE, with emphasis on style, iconography, historical development of painting in its sociocultural, political, and religious contexts. Treats current debates in scholarship.

CLAR 488 The Archaeology of the Near East in the Iron Age (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 241. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A survey of the principal sites, monuments, and art of the Iron Age Near East, ca. 1200 to 500 BCE.

CLAR 489 The Archaeology of Anatolia in the Bronze and Iron Ages (3). Prerequisite, CLAR 241. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. A survey of Anatolian archaeology from the third millennium through the sixth century BCE.

CLAR 491 The Archaeology of Early Greece (1200–500 BCE) (3). This course surveys the development of Greek material culture from 1200 to 500 BCE, exploring the origins of Greek art, architecture, cities, and sanctuaries in the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean. [Formerly CLAR 490.]

CLAR 512 Ancient Synagogues (JWST 512, RELI 512) (3). Prerequisite, RELI 110 or consent. This is a course on ancient synagogues in Palestine and the Diaspora from the Second Temple period to the seventh century AD.

CLAR 561 Mosaics: The Art of Mosaic in Greece, Rome, and Byzantium (3). Required preparation, any course in classics, art history, or religious studies. Traces the development of mosaic technique from Greek antiquity through the Byzantine Middle Ages as revealed by archaeological investigations and closely analyzes how this dynamic medium conveyed meaning.

CLAR 650 Field School in Classical Archaeology (6). This course is an introduction to archaeological field methods and excavation techniques, through participation in archaeological excavation.

Religious Studies

RELI 063 First-Year Seminar. The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls (3). In this seminar students learn about the Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient manuscripts dating to the time of Jesus from caves around the site of Qumran by the Dead Sea. They include early copies of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and sectarian works of the Jewish community that lived in Qumran.

RELI 110 The Archaeology of Palestine in the New Testament Period (CLAR 110, JWST 110) (3). This course surveys the archaeology of Palestine (modern Israel and Jordan) from the Persian period (circa 586 BC) to the Muslim conquest (640 AD).

RELI 375 The Archaeology of Cult: The Material Culture of Greek Religion (CLAR 375) (3). This course examines the archaeological context of Greek religion, cults, and associated rituals from the Bronze Age until the Hellenistic period with emphasis on urban, rural, and panhellenic sanctuaries, and methods of approaching ancient religion and analyzing cult practices.

RELI 512 Ancient Synagogues (JWST 512, CLAR 512) (3). Prerequisite, RELI 110 or consent. This is a course on ancient synagogues in Palestine and the Diaspora from the Second Temple period to the seventh century AD.

Archaeology

ARCH 393 Internship in Archaeology (3-6). Permission of the instructor and the director of undergraduate studies. Internships combine substantive work experience with an academic project.

ARCH 395 Research in Archaeology (1-6). Permission of the instructor. For students who wish to participate in laboratory or field research programs. May be taken twice.

ARCH 396 Independent Study in Archaeology (1-6). Permission of the instructor. Special reading and research in archaeology under the supervision of a selected instructor. May be taken twice.

ARCH 691H Seniors Honors Thesis, Part 1 (3). Permission of the instructor. Restricted to senior honors candidates. First semester of senior honors thesis. Independent research under the direction of an archaeology curriculum faculty member.

ARCH 692H Senior Honors Thesis, Part 2 (3). Permission of the instructor. Restricted to senior honors candidates. Second semester of senior honors thesis. Independent research under the direction of an archaeology curriculum faculty member.